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High-Tech Low-Cost Solutions. Perspectives for Nordic Companies

This report looks at the potential of frugal innovation for Nordic companies operating in emerging markets.
  • 15/04/2016Regenerative electric/hybrid drive train for ships RENSEA II

    This report describes the results of the work of an enlarged Nordic project group in phase II of the RENSEA project. The project was to develop, design, integrate and test a regenerative plugin hybrid-electric propulsion (RPHP) for sail boats. Opal, a whale watching boat used for shorter trips as well as for expeditions at the coast of Iceland and in Eastern Greenland, was used as a case demonstrator for this project.
  • 14/04/2016PIPE Pelagic Industry Processing Effluents Innovative and Sustainable Solutions

    The project main goals are to solve the problem of high organic load effluents in the marinated herring industries by investigating environmentally friendly and cost effective technological solutions and to characterize and valorise the molecules obtained from the organic fractions recovered. The intermediate objectives are delineated in 4 work packages
  • 22/02/2016The Nordic Digital Ecosystem Actors, Strategies, Opportunities

    This report describes possibilities for Nordic digital collaboration by providing an overview of the actors in the Nordic digital ecosystem and their characteristics, an analysis of the actors’ will and abilities to collaborate, and a discussion of potential business cases for such collaboration.
  • 14/01/2016APRICOT - Automated Pinbone Removal in Cod and Whitefish

    The main objective of the project was to develop a technology and equipment to cut pinbones from fish fillets by automatic means. Pinbones are a series of bones in fish fillets, located at the most valuable part of the fillet. These bones are usually removed from the fillet by manual cutting. This manual operation is labor intensive, tedious, and requires skill that takes time and practice to develop. It is critical that the cutting operation (whether manual or automatic) does not leave any bones or bone fragments in the fillet. At the same time, it is important to minimize the amount of high-value raw material that is cut away with the pinbone removal.
  • 13/01/2016Aquaponics NOMA (Nordic Marine) – New Innovations for Sustainable Aquaculture in the Nordic Countries

    The main objective of AQUAPONICS NOMA (Nordic Marine) was to establish innovation networks on co-production of plants and fish (aquaponics), and thereby improve Nordic competitiveness in the marine & food sector. To achieve this, aquaponics production units were established in Iceland, Norway and Denmark, adapted to the local needs and regulations.
  • 14/01/2016Enriched Convenience Seafood Products

    Consumers can choose from a variety of food supplements for their diet. The food supplement market of vitamins, minerals and proteins has been steadily growing as functional foods. Consumers increasingly search for food products with known bioactivity either natural or added ingredients as means to improve their health or prevent diseases.
  • 14/01/2016North Atlantic Ocean Cluster Alliance Building bridges in the North Atlantic

    There were two main goals of the project, one short term and the other long term. The primary short term goal was to build a strong and stable relationship with the clusters and high tech firms around the North Atlantic developing new solutions in niche markets. The long term goal was to build both a stronger identity of the North Atlantic regions as world class provider of technology for the marine sector and more cooperation in high-cost and high-risk production that take several years to develop and to market.
  • 14/01/2016Local fish feed ingredients for competitive and sustainable production of high-quality aquaculture feed LIFF

    The main objective of the project was to test new local raw materials for aquaculture feed and to implement those into the production chain, thereby:
  • 14/01/2016Fremtidens fiskedisk Et åpent innovasjonsprosjekt mellom sentrale Nordiske aktører innenfor sjømat og dagligvarehandelen

    The project has led to increased turnover in all the involved stores. The highest change came in the store that was willing to adapt to the complete new concept for the fish counter. The retail chains have been involved in the development process from day one. We have been working according to the principles of open innovation – and it has opened many eyes for new ways to cooperate.
  • 14/01/2016Explore the sea of opportunities Nordic Innovation Marine Marketing Program /NIMMP

    From October 29th to November 2nd 2012 eighteen university students from all the Nordic countries assembled at the Faroe Islands to take on a marine sector relatedchallenge in a four days boot camp. The challenge was presented by related members in the sector that are looking for fresh and innovative ideas for the field. The whole trip wasrecorded and the video used to promote the marine sector as a thrilling career option.
  • 14/01/2016InTerAct Industry – Academia Interaction in the Marine Sector

    The InTerAct project “Industry - Academia Interaction in the Marine sector”, was initiated to explore the education needs of the aquatic food industry and to identify the interest areasof students that qualify for higher education programmes such as the international master programme AQFood Aquatic Food Production - Safety and Quality ( main activities of the InTerAct project were aimed at positioning the higher education programme and creating new ways to recruit students.
  • 14/01/2016Innovative Fish Counters

    The main purpose with the project ”innovative fish counters” was to create a common Nordic industry standard, create a new set of rules for the Nordic Championship in Fish and Shellfish and create new and innovative ideas/tools to make life as a fishmonger in the Nordic countries better, by ideas that could motivate a greater consumption of seafood in the Nordic region.
  • 14/01/2016Nordic Algae Network

    The project aim is to help the participants to a leading position in the field of utilizing algae for energy purposes and for commercial exploitation of high value compounds from algae. An additional aim is to increase the synergy and facilitating collaboration between the participants involved in the project and thereby increase their ability to compete in this new field.
  • 14/01/2016Novel bioactive seaweed based ingredients and products

    Marine seaweeds are a highly underutilized resource in the Nordic region with great potential. Seaweeds are known to contain unique compounds that can find many uses in consumer products. The Nordic countries have a unique position to create significant value from its very abundant seaweed resources. Previous research has demonstrated that the seaweed species bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) contains extremely bioactive antioxidants, more than any other seaweed researched. Bladderwrack was therefore the focus of this project.
  • 14/01/2016Profitable Arctic charr farming in the Nordic countries

    The present study evaluated these earlier findings under practical conditions in commercial aquaculture production, to verify the results of the laboratory trials.Reduced protein content was combined with high fishmeal substitution in diets and the diets tested as compared to the commercial diets used by partners in the three Nordiccountries involved. The evaluation was carried out at four Arctic charr farms, two in Iceland and one in Norway, in addition a fourth trial, with triplicate groups carried out inSweden. An additional trial was set up in Iceland to study the effects of different amount of protein and plant protein on the environment and fish welfare. The quality of thefish produced was evaluated in all trials, either through sensory evaluation tests or by ordinary consumer tests.
  • 14/01/2016WhiteFishMaLL North Atlantic Whitefish Marine Living Lab

    Cod and haddock products from the North Atlantic come primarily from sustainably harvested stocks, are healthy to eat and have comparatively low environmental impact. In an ideal world these favourable characteristics should provide these products with a competitive advantage and higher prices in the market, but currently this is not the case. A key reason for this is the lack of differentiation of cod and haddock products from the N-Atlantic compared to other whitefish species, for example similar products from Asia – e.g. pangasius and tilapia. The products are homogeneous, they do not stand out in comparison with competing products and there is little done to try to highlight the many positive properties that they have. The WhiteFishMaLL project was initiated to address these challenges.
  • 15/10/201530 sustainable Nordic buildings

    A book containing best practice examples of sustainable Nordic buildings based on the Charter principles.
  • 23/02/2015The Dynamics of Social Responsibility and Innovation: A study of Nordic 500 Companies

    The project “Nordic Experiences: Corporate Social Responsibility and Innovation strategies in Nordic Companies” has established a unique list of the 500 largest companies in the Nordic region and explores whether companies in the Nordic region have implemented a relationship between innovation and social responsibility in their business strategies. Within the Nordic region the 500 largest companies constitute the core of economic development and growth. How do companies integrate the sustainability and responsibility policies in their day to day business operations?
  • 16/06/2014Digital Toolbox: Innovation for Nordic Tourism SMEs

    This report focuses on meeting the practical needs of tourism businesses in the Nordic countries when adopting and employing ICT in their operations.
  • 01/04/2014Environmentally Sustainable Construction Products and Materials – Assessment of release and emissions

    The main objectives of sustainable construction activities are to avoid resource depletion of energy, water, and raw materials and to prevent environmental degradation caused by facilities and infrastructure throughout their life cycle.
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